SAT/ACT college Entrance Exams

 Most universities require SAT or ACT exam scores as part of their admissions process.

Some universites require SAT subject tests also.

Contact the university to which you are applying to determine which exams they require.

Community colleges do not require college admissions testing.

You may register online at www.collegeboard.com or www.actstudent.org

The SAT test will be offered at CCHS 2017/18 school year on the following days:

December 2, 2017

March 10, 2018

May 5, 2018

The ACT test will be offered at CCHS 2017/18 school year on the following days:

October 28, 2017

December 9, 2017

April 14, 2018

June 9, 2018


NOTICE: STUDENTS MUST REQUEST THEIR ACT AND SAT TEST SCORES TO BE SENT DIRECTLY
TO THE SCHOOLS THEY WILL APPLY TO WHEN THEY REGISTER FOR THE TESTS!

Test scores are confidential. They will no longer be included on the student's high school transcript.
ACT and SAT will charge a fee to send test scores at a later date,
but score reporting is free to up to four schools at the time of registration.

The Churchill County High School CEEB Code is 290060

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SAT
ACT
Verbal Reasoning 33% Math Resoning 33%, Writing 33% Analogies, math grid-ins, penalty for incorrect answers, no career interest inventory Cost: $51.00 (SAT Includes Writing)
English 25%, Math 25% Reading 25%, Science Reasoning 25% No analogies, no math grid-ins, no penalty for incorrect answer, career interest inventory Cost: $36.50 (ACT Plus Writing $52.50)
How Colleges Use Your Scores
College Entrance Exams
Each 4-year college uses admission tests differently to assess your readiness for college work. But they are only one part of your college application. Colleges also consider your grades, course rigor and recommendations.
SAT is a college admission test administered by the Collegeboard It is designed to test your Verbal and Math reasoning. Writing is also tested. It costs $50.00 and is administered at many high schools throughout the state usually on a Saturday. The next 2 test days for our test center (290060), CCHS, is March 9 and May 4. The deadline for registration for the March 9 test is February 8 (you must register at www.collegeboard.com The deadline for the May 4 test is April 5.
Most colleges publish student test-score information so that you can see how your scores compare. Think of these scores as a guide, not a cutoff Admission tests let colleges find you. When you sign up for an admission test, you can indicate your desire to have your name shared with interested colleges.
ACT is another college entrance exam which tests English, Math, Reading and Science reasoning. It costs $35.00 for the test without writing and $50.00 to take the test with writing. www.actstudent.org The next time it will be administered at CCHS is June 8. With a registration deadline of May 3.
Colleges may use scores to award scholarships. Most scholarship money-money you do not have to pay back- comes from colleges. Other organizations and private companies that award scholarships may also require your test scores.
Most 4-year universities require SAT or ACT exams as part of their admission process. Some require that you take the Writing test, some do not. Some also require SAT subject tests. You can find out which exam the college you wish to apply to require by exploring their website on line or contacting them.
Scores may determine placement in college classes.
COMMUNITY/ JUNIOR/ 2 YEAR COLLEGES such at Western Nevada College (WNC), Great Basin, Truckee Meadows (TMC) do not require that you take a college admission test. They do not have specific entrance criteria for you to attend and do not have admission deadlines.
Nearly all 4-yr. colleges require scores and some 2-year colleges recommend them.
Many 4-year colleges have admission deadlines in the fall prior to December so we advise that if you are required to take a college admission test that you
1. Have a list of colleges you plan to apply to
2. Find out which test (with or without writing) you need to take
3. Know their admission deadline so that you can take your college admission exam well before the deadline for admission
4. Take an exam in your junior year so that you may evaluate whether you want to take it again to improve your score.
Colleges consider multiple scores in different way. You decide who sees your scores. Some colleges require all our scores, some look at your highest combined scores from one test date, some accept your highest section scores from any day you test.
If you are a student on free or reduced lunch we are able in most cases to
provide a waiver to cover the fee for the exam.
You would need to contact Mrs. Wood in the counseling office.
The fee cannot cover late registration charges…
so make sure you apply on time by planning in advance!
They may earn you college credit… Some colleges allow you to skip some introductory courses and may even grant credit if you score high enough on your admission test. This could save your both time and money. Check the credit and placement policies at the college you are interested in.
College Entrance Testing
ACT and SAT Subj Tests
PSAT (also known as the National Merit
Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT))
ACT (American College Test)
What it covers: The PSAT covers reading, vocabulary, grammar and usage, writing, and math (Arithmetic, Geometry and Algebra 1). There is not an essay portion included in the writing section of this exam.
Why it's offered: The PSAT offers college-bound students a practice shot at standardized testing. A superior score on the PSAT can also lead to recognition as a National Merit Scholar during a student's junior year. This scholarship offers a monetary award and looks excellent on a college transcript.
When it's taken: PSATs are administered in October, primarily to juniors since only they are eligible for the National Merit Scholarship. However, it's becoming more common for younger students to take them exam as a means to familiarize themselves with the exam and the testing process.
Registration Dates: Unlike the SAT and ACT, registration for this exam is done through a student's high school. Students must contact their guidance office in September to register.
How it's scored: Each of the three sections on the PSAT (Math, Critical Reading, and Writing) is scored out of 80 points. The maximum total score a student can achieve is 240. Students get one point for each correct answer and lose ¼ point for each incorrect answer. Because the test is standardized, students are given a scaled score. Scores are distributed to school guidance departments from the College Board; students typically receive scores from their guidance departments between December and early January.
What it covers: The ACT tests reading, grammar and usage, science reasoning, and math (Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra 1 and 2, and limited Trigonometry). It also has an optional writing section.
Why it's offered: The ACT is a tool used by college admissions officers to quantitatively gauge the college-readiness of students continuing their education after high school.
When it's taken: The ACT is offered six times per year: September, October, December, February (except in NY), April and June. It is traditionally taken in the spring of junior year and fall of senior year. For a list of this year's test dates, click here .
Registration Dates: Regular registration is done no later than 5 weeks in advance; late registration, with an extra charge, can be done no later than 3 weeks in advance of the test date. Click here to register.
How it's scored: Each of the four sections on the ACT (Math, Reading, English and Science) is scored on a scale between 1 and 36. Students receive 1 point for each correct answer and do not lose any points for incorrect answers. Therefore, it is to the student's advantage to guess on any question he or she doesn't know. The raw score of each section is then scaled. Scores from each section are averaged to yield a composite score between 1 and 36. The optional essay is scored by two readers who award between 1 and 6 points each, yielding a totally score between 2 and 12 points. If essay scores differ by more than one point, a third individual will score the essay.
SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test)
SAT Subject Tests
(formerly known as the SAT IIs)
What it covers: The SAT tests reading, vocabulary, grammar and usage, writing (including an essay) and math (Arithmetic, Geometry, Algebra 1 and 2)
Why it's offered: The SAT is offered as a tool used by college admissions officers to quantitatively gauge the college-readiness of students continuing their education after high school.
When it's taken: The SAT is offered seven times per year: October, November, December, January, March, May and June. It's traditionally taken in the spring of junior year and fall of senior year although advanced students may complete testing by the end of junior year.
Registration Dates: Regular registration is done no later than 5 weeks in advance; late registration, which incurs an additional charge, must be completed no later than 3 weeks before the test date . Click here to register.
How it's scored: Each of the three sections on the SAT (Math, Critical Reading, and Writing) is scored out of 800 points (students seeking to compare their PSAT scores can simply add a zero to each PSAT individual section or composite score to get an equivalent SAT score.) The maximum total score a student can achieve is 2400. Students get one point for each correct answer and lose ¼ point for each incorrect answer. Since the test is standardized, students are scored on a scale. The essay portion of the writing section is one third of the total score in that section. Two graders will score the essay and award between 1 and 6 points each, yielding a total score between 2 and 12 points. If essay scores differ by more than one point, a third individual will score the essay.
What it covers: There are 20 SAT Subject Tests including math (level I and II), literature, several foreign languages, history and the sciences. The complete list can be viewed here .
Why it's offered: SAT II Subject Tests are offered to assess a student's mastery of a particular subject area. They are used as additional criteria by particularly selective colleges or to gain admittance into majors that require a specific background or skill set.
When it's taken: All SAT II Subject Tests are offered on the same dates as regular SATs, however there are no SAT Subject Tests in March. The exception to this is the foreign language listening exam which is only offered in November and World History which is offered twice annually. Students may not take the SAT and SAT subject tests on the same day. However, students may take up to three SAT IIs on one day. Subject tests are usually taken after a relevant course is completed or near completion, particularly with AP classes. For example, if a student takes Biology or AP Biology as a sophomore, they should plan on taking the SAT II in May or June of their sophomore year. This means many students will take an SAT subject test before they take a full SAT. Juniors typically take SATs in March and June of their junior year and focus on SAT Subject test in May around the same time as AP exams.
Registration Dates: SAT II registration dates and deadlines are the same as those of the regular SAT. Most juniors typically take the SAT Subject tests in May at the same time as AP exams since there is content overlap. Click here to register.
How it's scored: The number of questions on each exam varies, but these tests are scored in the same manner as the SAT. The maximum score for each subject is 800. Students get one point for each correct answer and lose ¼ point for each incorrect answer. The exams are scaled, since the exam is standardized.

WNC Course Placement Important Information

Every student planning to register for English and math courses at WNC must take placement tests. Testing will assess a student's current skills in reading, writing, and mathematics. Test results will help students select appropriate courses to take at WNC. In some cases, there are also qualifying test scores for course enrollment.

For more information about the Accuplacer exam, please visit one of the following links:

Those with recent ACT/SAT scores (no more than two years old for English and no more than one year old for math) or with appropriate courses from other colleges may be exempt. Students who are not sure if they need to test should contact a counselor.

Math Placement and Course Options for Math 091 and Math 093
Students should enroll in math classes based on their Accuplacer placement test scores or upon successful completion of the prerequisite class.

Students who test into Math 091 or Math 093 should be aware that Federal Financial Aid will not pay for classes below the 095 level. Your options include:

  1. Enroll in the math course you tested into and pay the tuition on your own, or
  2. Don't enroll in a math course this semester. Instead, complete an independent, on-line math tutorial through ALEKS.com and re-test in November to see if you can test into Math 095 next semester. Check their website at ALEKS.com for the cost of the tutorial (approximately $20 per month).

ACT and SAT required scores:

ACT SAT
English 100 18 440
English 101 21 510
Math 095 17 400
Math 96 19 470
Math 120 22 500
Math 126 22 500
Math 127 22 500
Math 128 22 500
Math 176 25 560
Math 181 28 630
Stats 152 25 560

The best predictor for college math placement is successful completion of the course prerequisite. Testing is available by appointment at the Carson City, Douglas, and Fallon campuses. There is a $15 testing fee for placement tests. Photo identification is also required.There is $15 testing fee for proctored tests (WNC staff and students are exempt).

To schedule a testing appointment or for further information:

Carson City: 775-445-3267

Fallon: 775-423-7565

Douglas: 775-782-2413